Unit 22: The French Revolution

Storming of the Bastille

Unit 22 High School

Unit Overview

Subjects Covered
Grammar, Literature, Composition, History
Time Period
Reformation and Revolutions
Grade Level
High School: 9 – 12
Civilization
English and American
Literature
A Tale of Two Cities – by Charles Dickens

Louis XVIUnit Description

“The eighteenth century closed with an upheaval of the French people which overturned the existing system of Europe. It again raised France from a position of weakness to one of power, and it spread abroad ideas which have shaped all subsequent history. The English Revolution of 1688, and the American Revolution of 1775, both brought to logical completion institutions of long and steady growth. The French Revolution, on the other hand, broke sharply with the past, and changed the direction of national development. It is the purpose of the present chapter to examine the facts in the general situation which made this revolution possible, and to sketch the new ideas which guided its progress…” – Samuel Bannister Harding

Leading Ideas and Biblical Principles

  • History is HIS Story – God’s story of love, mercy, and redemption through Christ.
    • He made known to us the mystery of his will according to his good pleasure, which he purposed in Christ, to be put into effect when the times reach their fulfillment—to bring unity to all things in heaven and on earth under Christ. — Ephesians 1‍:‍9-10
  • God’s providential hand governs and times all events and provides for His Creation according to His plan and purposes.
    • The God who made the world and everything in it is the Lord of heaven and earth and does not live in temples built by human hands. And he is not served by human hands, as if he needed anything. Rather, he himself gives everyone life and breath and everything else. From one man he made all the nations, that they should inhabit the whole earth; and he marked out their appointed times in history and the boundaries of their lands. God did this so that they would seek him and perhaps reach out for him and find him, though he is not far from any one of us.- Acts 17: 24 – 27
  • Godly leadership and servanthood are necessary for one to be a true reforming influence.
    • Whoever wants to become great among you must be your servant, and whoever wants to be first must be your slave—just as the Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many..- Matthew 20:26 – 28
  • God raises up and removes leaders.
    • He changes times and seasons; he deposes kings and raises up others. He gives wisdom to the wise and knowledge to the discerning..- Daniel 2:21

Unit 22 Resources: High School

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Lesson 1: History

Lesson One Assignments:

  • Review the discussion questions, then read the article: The Eve of the French Revolution, pages 5-14.
  • Narrate about today’s reading using the appropriate notebook page. Be sure to answer the discussion questions and include key people, events, and dates within the narration.
  • Be sure to visit www.ArtiosHCS.com for additional resources.

Lesson One Discussion Questions:

  • What was the obstacle to the complete removal of the feudal abuses which oppressed the peasants?
  • Why were the oppressive guild regulations not repealed?
  • From what two sources would objections come to the removal of the censorship of the press?
  • In your own words state the connection between the advance of natural science and the French Revolution.
  • In what ways did England help trigger the Revolution in France?
  • Is there any similarity of ideas between Rousseau’s Social Contract and the American Declaration of Independence? If so, how do you account for it?
  • How did the aid which France gave the American colonies contribute to bring about the French Revolution?
Lesson 2: History

Lesson Two Assignments:

  • Review the discussion questions, then read the article: The French Revolution, pages 16-30.
  • Narrate about today’s reading using the appropriate notebook page. Be sure to answer the discussion questions and include key people, events, and dates within the narration.
  • Be sure to visit www.ArtiosHCS.com for additional resources.

Lesson Two Discussion Questions:

  • Was the transformation of the Estates-General into the National Assembly necessary for the reform of the abuses under which France suffered? Why?
  • What was the significance of the fall of the Bastille?
  • How did the organization of the National Guard contribute to the success of the French Revolution?
  • Did the nobles deserve much credit for their surrender of their feudal rights on August 4? Why?
  • To what extent are the principles of the Rights of Man now in force in the United States? Were any of them in force in France before the Revolution?
  • Was the Constitution of 1791 more or less radical than the constitution in Great Britain at that time? What was the chief difference in their constitutions?
  • What good did the Jacobin club do? What ill?
  • Sum up the things which contributed to the growth of a republican party in France.
  • How long was the Constitution of 1791 in force?
  • How did the wars contribute to its overthrow?
  • In your opinion, was the execution of the king justifiable? Was it expedient?
  • Was Fox or Burke more correct in his estimate of the French Revolution?
  • Why was the addition of Great Britain to the ranks of the enemies of France so significant?
  • What arguments might be used for and against the Reign of Terror?
  • What is your opinion of Robespierre?
  • In what ways does the establishing of the Directory mark a step in advance? In what ways was it a backward step?
  • Was the Revolution up to 1795 a success or failure? Why?
Literature

Literature Assignments

  • Read the assignment background information on Character Analysis, then read Chapters 1 – 6, “Book the Third” of A Tale of Two Cities.
  • Using the character cards you have worked on in previous units, choose one character for deeper study.
  • Write an outline for a character analysis essay on this character. Remember to use complete sentences; this will be helpful when you write your essay in Unit 23.

Unit 22 Extra Resources: High School